THE AFFORDABILITY CRISIS

problem-picHomelessness, substandard housing and the lack of affordable options are part of a national crisis that destroys lives, wrenches families apart and degrades communities. Every day more people live on the edge and solutions are often elusive.

Houston has experienced some of the highest housing cost increases in the nation.

Since 2011:
• 36% increase in cost to rent an apartment
• 33% increase in cost to buy a single family home

High housing costs leave low-income persons with little money for other important expenses like healthcare, food and education. This leads to difficult budget trade-offs. National studies report that one in four renters paid more than 50% of their income on housing costs.

THE FACTS OF HOMELESSNESS IN HOUSTON

Although Houston is our nation’s fourth largest city, we are woefully behind in meeting the need for affordable housing.  Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH) has been in particularly short supply. PSH is defined as multifamily apartment housing with both rental subsidies and vital support services.

In response to this need, Mayor Annise Parker committed to end chronic ‘street’ and veteran homelessness by 2016, including access to 2,500 units of PSH for individudals and families. The City names New Hope Housing as one of the affordable housing developers leading this effort. Mayor Sylvester Turner has pledged his support to continue this great effort – one that has become a nationally recognized model for successfully preventing and ending homelessness.